Kombucha Alcohol Content | Does Kombucha Have Alcohol?


Kombucha Alcohol Content

So wait does kombucha have alcohol? Because I am totally buzzing right now!

Kombucha is a tea based drink which has health benefits and medicinal values and the Kombucha alcohol content is always a matter of discussion.

For those that do not know already (though I hope you do if you are on this site), Kombucha can also be made at home.

It contains different species of yeast and bacteria and organic acids, active enzymes and amino acids. Acetic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, oxalic acid, butyric acid and usnic acid are the different acids contained in kombucha.

Kombucha can be classified as a non alcoholic beverage as it contains only 0.5% alcohol.  Kombucha contains yeast and bacteria and in pasteurized versions the process kills the yeast which makes the alcohol and in unpasteurized versions, yeast is left alive which converts sugar to alcohol.

The beverage which contains sugar in more quantity will ferment more alcohol.

Below are some specific idea/points/meanderings about the alcohol found in kombucha, as well as some basic info regarding kombucha and home brewing, for the peeps that have not yet taken our free 7 day kombucha mini course to catch everybody up to speed on kombucha alcohol content.

Some Kombucha Alcohol Content Facts

  • The analysis of home brew versions of Kombucha has shown that the active components in it are similar to glucaric acid. Glucaric acid which is found abundantly in fruits and vegetables can act as a cancer preventive agent and is it also makes the liver more efficient.
  • Studies have been made among the people who have been using Kombucha over a long period and it has been proved that it has helped in improving the energy levels and reducing metabolic disorders, digestive problems, allergies, fatigue and the problems of arthritis.
  • The alcohol contents of Kombucha are a main factor which decides the labeling of the bottle and classification of the beverage.

Prescribed Kombucha Alcohol Content

It is very important to know that the Kombucha alcohol content is very less when proper care is taken while brewing and storing. It should be prevented from being contaminated.  When Kombucha is being prepared you should ensure that it is done in a clean environment and maintains proper temperature and a low pH.

While the preparation process is progressing your hands and utensils and everything else which comes into contact with it has to be kept cleaned.   Acidic conditions are good for the growth of Kombucha culture and hence maintaining correct pH is very important while brewing at home.

The pH value of it should be maintained between 2.5 and 4.6 as a pH less than 2.5 will turn the drink more acidic and makes unfit for human consumption (in terms of drinking it like a bottle of kombucha at a time.. but great as a dressing or a little bit in some water.. kind of like apple cider vinegar)  while a ph more than 4.6 will increase the threat of contamination.

kombucha tea alcohol content

Proper Fermentation keeps Kombucha alcohol content level right

Kombucha preparation is a process which you can finish within one hour at your own home.  When you prepare it at home the expenses are less than that you meet when you buy it at a food store.

Filtered water, organic teabags whether green tea or black tea, white granulated sugar and scoby mushroom are the ingredients that are needed for the preparation of the Kombucha.

A glass jar, food grade funnel, paper towels, bottles and stainless steel pots are the equipments that are to be used. Ensure that all the equipment is cleaned properly.  Water is to be boiled in a stainless steel pot for almost ten minutes.

The boiling water is to be poured into the brewing container and then tea bags can be added.  It can be allowed to boil for twenty minutes or even more.  After that the tea bags can be removed and sugar is to be added.

The mixture should be allowed to cool to a temperature of seventy degrees. Now it is time to add mushroom and starter liquid.  Paper towel is to be kept over the container and kept tightly by a rubber band.  It is to be fermented at room temperature for about eight to twelve days.  This is a process which is to done away from direct sunlight.

At first tea surface will have a glassy look, then it turns jellylike and finally it becomes thicker and opaque.  Now the brew is ready to be poured into bottles and sealed.  It is important to ensure that it is closed with airtight seal or else the tea may turn vinegary.

When this sealed bottles are kept at room temperature for two to three days it carbonates after which it can be kept in refrigerator. It is to be noted that the filled bottles may explode if they are kept at room temperature for more than a week.

Kombucha FDA?
The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau classify beverages containing 0.5 percent alcohol as Alcohol beverages.  But Kombucha which cannot be said to as beer or wine or a distilled spirit cannot be classified as alcoholic beverage.

The synergy Kombucha alcohol content (as well as other kombucha companies) is slightly higher and that can occur after the product has been bottled.

Reports say that the synergy products are compliant at the time of shipping and alcohol levels are increased subsequently.

Some of the famous manufacturers have changed the formulas so as to reduce the alcohol content in the Kombucha beverage.  Gt Kombucha alcohol content is within the prescribed limits of 0.5%.

[UPDATE - now many companies like gt dave are making different versions so that people who are over 21 can still get the original kombucha alcohol recipe!).

Effects of Kombucha Alcohol?

ok so many people have told me the following...

The Kombucha tea alcohol content of one to three percent are important to the pregnant and lactating mothers and also drivers. This Kompucha alcohol content may not affect your driving capacity but may be detected on an alcohol test.

Kombucha alcohol content is less in the drinks when it is properly brewed and stored and the drunken effects if any experienced by you may be from detox and not the alcohol content.

But what do YOU think?

Does kombucha make you drunk?  If so do you think it is because of the alcohol or something else going on?  Leave your comment below.

Happy Brewin',

Dave

 

 


"Thank you so much Dave, for creating this course. My homemade kombucha now tastes even better than the store kind." - Cindy W.

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About Kombucha Dave

Happy go lucky guy who most recently (past 6 years or so), has been enjoying his time teaching people how to make kombucha, traveling, and playing dodgeball. If you are asking yourself what is kombucha? Fear not, as it is one of the most common questions I receive on a daily basis... that and why are you always smiling? :) Connect with me on Google+ Find us on Google+


6 Responses to “Kombucha Alcohol Content | Does Kombucha Have Alcohol?”

  1. Amy says:

    Howdy KD. I have my first ever batch of kombucha brewing right now. We are on day 7. I checked and there is a transparent scoby on top! Yay!
    BUT my question is totally related to your article here… I have had Kombucha a number (a whole number not greater than 10) of times and have liked it ONCE. I'm going to force myself to like it because it is so undeniably good for one's health. So my friend that made it when I enjoyed it adds chunks of pineapple 3 days before stopping the fermentation. She is a recovering alcoholic, and I don't drink alcohol beverages. Perhaps it was a psychosomatic one, but I totally got a buzz off her kombucha. That is not saying much, but I'd rather not be making alcoholic beverages in my home. What do you think? Won't increasing the sugar content by adding a super sugary fruit make increase the alcohol content??? Help!
    Thanks!

  2. Aline Allard says:

    I bought a bottle of organic raw kombucha, and did not know to refridgerate, it has been 2 weeks out of fridge. I was wondering if it is still good to drink. Thank you, Aline 

  3. Rosemary says:

    Just a friendly reminder that stainless steel shouldn’t be used, as it interacts with the scoby in a negative way. Only plastic and glass.

    • Dave says:

      hi Rosemary! thank you so much for the comment as the more perspectives the better. my personal opinion, from my experience and research, is that stainless steel is perfectly fine from a safety point of view.. though I do not recommend long term brewing or storage based on the taste it might produce over time.. but to use stainless steel to boil your water is, in my opinion, perfectly acceptable. what do others think?

  4. Erik says:

    Like all acids, acetic acid can corrode metal, producing hydrogen gas and acetates of the metal– and that funky taste. Use metal at your own risk, even stainless steel. Glass is the way to go, typically wide-mouth Mason jars. Food-grade plastic is also useable. I tighten the mason lid ring right over a doubled paper towel and it works great. I write the projected end day/date on the paper towel. ;) happy brewing

  5. Brian says:

    I drank a whole growler (64 oz. ) of Kombucha over the course of about 2 hours and then had to take a breathalyzer before graduating high school. There was absolutely no change in my alcohol content. YMMV.

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